If I Lived In An Ivy Covered House
It Would Look Like This // Photography by Andrea Dumovich
If I Lived In An Ivy Covered House
+
originsf:

Case Study #12: Fort Point 
Brief History: Fort Point was built between 1853 and 1861 at $2.8 million by the US Army. Nestled directly below the Golden Gate Bridge on the San Francisco line, Fort Point was built to protect the Bay from outside invaders during the Gold Rush era. Architecturally, Fort Point was designed using “Third Style”— a term for military architecture built in the nineteenth century. Third Style represents a uniquely specialized time where a professional planning board oversaw the entire process from design through construction.
Why This Matters: Before the Golden Gate Bridge was built there was talk of deconstructing the Fort. Chief Engineer Joseph Strauss fought to keep the Fort by designing a unique arch for the Bridge that enabled the Fort to remain below. The Fort has been used on a variety of occasions—to house unmarried officers in the 1920s and soldiers during WWII—yet it was never once put to its proper use during battle. It is lucky for us that the Fort has been salvaged from potential war decimation and bridge construction. Today it is a place that takes people back to a time when the Bay meant a great deal to its people, not so different than today. 
originsf:

Case Study #12: Fort Point 
Brief History: Fort Point was built between 1853 and 1861 at $2.8 million by the US Army. Nestled directly below the Golden Gate Bridge on the San Francisco line, Fort Point was built to protect the Bay from outside invaders during the Gold Rush era. Architecturally, Fort Point was designed using “Third Style”— a term for military architecture built in the nineteenth century. Third Style represents a uniquely specialized time where a professional planning board oversaw the entire process from design through construction.
Why This Matters: Before the Golden Gate Bridge was built there was talk of deconstructing the Fort. Chief Engineer Joseph Strauss fought to keep the Fort by designing a unique arch for the Bridge that enabled the Fort to remain below. The Fort has been used on a variety of occasions—to house unmarried officers in the 1920s and soldiers during WWII—yet it was never once put to its proper use during battle. It is lucky for us that the Fort has been salvaged from potential war decimation and bridge construction. Today it is a place that takes people back to a time when the Bay meant a great deal to its people, not so different than today. 
originsf:

Case Study #12: Fort Point 
Brief History: Fort Point was built between 1853 and 1861 at $2.8 million by the US Army. Nestled directly below the Golden Gate Bridge on the San Francisco line, Fort Point was built to protect the Bay from outside invaders during the Gold Rush era. Architecturally, Fort Point was designed using “Third Style”— a term for military architecture built in the nineteenth century. Third Style represents a uniquely specialized time where a professional planning board oversaw the entire process from design through construction.
Why This Matters: Before the Golden Gate Bridge was built there was talk of deconstructing the Fort. Chief Engineer Joseph Strauss fought to keep the Fort by designing a unique arch for the Bridge that enabled the Fort to remain below. The Fort has been used on a variety of occasions—to house unmarried officers in the 1920s and soldiers during WWII—yet it was never once put to its proper use during battle. It is lucky for us that the Fort has been salvaged from potential war decimation and bridge construction. Today it is a place that takes people back to a time when the Bay meant a great deal to its people, not so different than today. 
originsf:

Case Study #12: Fort Point 
Brief History: Fort Point was built between 1853 and 1861 at $2.8 million by the US Army. Nestled directly below the Golden Gate Bridge on the San Francisco line, Fort Point was built to protect the Bay from outside invaders during the Gold Rush era. Architecturally, Fort Point was designed using “Third Style”— a term for military architecture built in the nineteenth century. Third Style represents a uniquely specialized time where a professional planning board oversaw the entire process from design through construction.
Why This Matters: Before the Golden Gate Bridge was built there was talk of deconstructing the Fort. Chief Engineer Joseph Strauss fought to keep the Fort by designing a unique arch for the Bridge that enabled the Fort to remain below. The Fort has been used on a variety of occasions—to house unmarried officers in the 1920s and soldiers during WWII—yet it was never once put to its proper use during battle. It is lucky for us that the Fort has been salvaged from potential war decimation and bridge construction. Today it is a place that takes people back to a time when the Bay meant a great deal to its people, not so different than today. 
originsf:

Case Study #12: Fort Point 
Brief History: Fort Point was built between 1853 and 1861 at $2.8 million by the US Army. Nestled directly below the Golden Gate Bridge on the San Francisco line, Fort Point was built to protect the Bay from outside invaders during the Gold Rush era. Architecturally, Fort Point was designed using “Third Style”— a term for military architecture built in the nineteenth century. Third Style represents a uniquely specialized time where a professional planning board oversaw the entire process from design through construction.
Why This Matters: Before the Golden Gate Bridge was built there was talk of deconstructing the Fort. Chief Engineer Joseph Strauss fought to keep the Fort by designing a unique arch for the Bridge that enabled the Fort to remain below. The Fort has been used on a variety of occasions—to house unmarried officers in the 1920s and soldiers during WWII—yet it was never once put to its proper use during battle. It is lucky for us that the Fort has been salvaged from potential war decimation and bridge construction. Today it is a place that takes people back to a time when the Bay meant a great deal to its people, not so different than today. 
originsf:

Case Study #12: Fort Point 
Brief History: Fort Point was built between 1853 and 1861 at $2.8 million by the US Army. Nestled directly below the Golden Gate Bridge on the San Francisco line, Fort Point was built to protect the Bay from outside invaders during the Gold Rush era. Architecturally, Fort Point was designed using “Third Style”— a term for military architecture built in the nineteenth century. Third Style represents a uniquely specialized time where a professional planning board oversaw the entire process from design through construction.
Why This Matters: Before the Golden Gate Bridge was built there was talk of deconstructing the Fort. Chief Engineer Joseph Strauss fought to keep the Fort by designing a unique arch for the Bridge that enabled the Fort to remain below. The Fort has been used on a variety of occasions—to house unmarried officers in the 1920s and soldiers during WWII—yet it was never once put to its proper use during battle. It is lucky for us that the Fort has been salvaged from potential war decimation and bridge construction. Today it is a place that takes people back to a time when the Bay meant a great deal to its people, not so different than today. 
+
originsf:

Case Study #13: Conservatory of Flowers
Brief History: The Conservatory was originally ordered to be built for wealthy real estate entrepreneur James Lick’s Santa Clara estate. However, Lick passed away before it was constructed. In 1878 the conservatory wooden kit (yet to be assembled) was bought at trustee sale by a group of civic-minded San Franciscans. They offered it as a gift to the City of San Francisco and just one year later, in 1879, the Conservatory was open to the public in Golden Gate Park. 

Why this Matters: The San Francisco Conservatory of Flowers is the oldest standing municipal wooden conservatory in the nation. Due to its decaying properties, wood was not a popular choice of material for conservatories in the 1800s. Thus it is quite rare that a wooden conservatory of such magnitude and beauty still stands erect in the 21st century. 
Though the original plan for the lush indoor garden was not intended for Golden Gate Park, it took a magical alignment of timing, place and people to give the Conservatory a home in the park. The Conservatory of Flowers is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and is considered a deeply valued historic landmark. The conservatory is open Tuesday through Sunday 10AM - 4:30PM. 

*Photos taken by Andrea
Note: The Conservatory offers a wide variety of incredible plants that were not mentioned in this article. More information about the various types of flowers can be read here. 
Further reading about the history is found here. 
originsf:

Case Study #13: Conservatory of Flowers
Brief History: The Conservatory was originally ordered to be built for wealthy real estate entrepreneur James Lick’s Santa Clara estate. However, Lick passed away before it was constructed. In 1878 the conservatory wooden kit (yet to be assembled) was bought at trustee sale by a group of civic-minded San Franciscans. They offered it as a gift to the City of San Francisco and just one year later, in 1879, the Conservatory was open to the public in Golden Gate Park. 

Why this Matters: The San Francisco Conservatory of Flowers is the oldest standing municipal wooden conservatory in the nation. Due to its decaying properties, wood was not a popular choice of material for conservatories in the 1800s. Thus it is quite rare that a wooden conservatory of such magnitude and beauty still stands erect in the 21st century. 
Though the original plan for the lush indoor garden was not intended for Golden Gate Park, it took a magical alignment of timing, place and people to give the Conservatory a home in the park. The Conservatory of Flowers is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and is considered a deeply valued historic landmark. The conservatory is open Tuesday through Sunday 10AM - 4:30PM. 

*Photos taken by Andrea
Note: The Conservatory offers a wide variety of incredible plants that were not mentioned in this article. More information about the various types of flowers can be read here. 
Further reading about the history is found here. 
+
Conservatory of Flowers // Golden Gate Park // May 2014
+
Outer Richmond // San Francisco // May 2014
+
+
Point Reyes National Seashore // March 2014
+
Pacific Heights // San Francisco // March 2014
+
Outer Sunset // San Francisco // March 2014
+
originsf:


Case Study #4: Orpheum Theater
Brief History: Built in 1926, the Orpheum Theater was designed by Benjamin Marcus Priteca and fashioned after a 12th-Century spanish cathedral. First named The Pantages Theatre after the vaudeville impresario Alexander Pantages, it was a prime theater for Cinerama entertainment. Cinerama was the process of showing widescreen films by simultaneously projecting images from three 35mm projectors onto one large, arched screen. It was a grand event to attend movies shown by Cinerama. People showed up wearing their finest for the evening. Though the Orpheum has changed ownership throughout the century, today it is run by Shorenstein Hays Nederlander (SHN), which actively hosts broadway productions. 
Why This Matters: Imagine you’re walking along the Mid-Market Corridor (better known as Civic Center Plaza/Tenderloin). You’re probably feeling a bit anxious and for good reason: newly built million-dollar high-rises are popping up left & right while the problems of the Tenderloin community are still very much alive. New construction bringing in young wealthy tenants won’t end Tenderloin poverty. These longtime street inhabitants have nowhere else to go; this is their home. With this context in mind I strolled down Mid-Market and looked up at the world, unguarded for once, and felt a wave of shock. Standing amidst the urban conflict of new growth taking over old, I stared at the Orpheum Theater, shining elegantly as ever.
San Francisco had its heyday of glamorous theaters. Sadly, one by one they have disappeared. It matters that the Orpheum Theater remains—going strong after so long—especially in the heart of the Tenderloin. Without old, beautiful and nearly decaying buildings that need a little TLC, the city would be lost of any identity from the past, having no diversity to move forward. If such a lovely Spanish-Gothic building from the 20th century can stand amongst the the turmoil and changes of the City then it leaves me hope that other buildings of the kind can do the same.  
originsf:


Case Study #4: Orpheum Theater
Brief History: Built in 1926, the Orpheum Theater was designed by Benjamin Marcus Priteca and fashioned after a 12th-Century spanish cathedral. First named The Pantages Theatre after the vaudeville impresario Alexander Pantages, it was a prime theater for Cinerama entertainment. Cinerama was the process of showing widescreen films by simultaneously projecting images from three 35mm projectors onto one large, arched screen. It was a grand event to attend movies shown by Cinerama. People showed up wearing their finest for the evening. Though the Orpheum has changed ownership throughout the century, today it is run by Shorenstein Hays Nederlander (SHN), which actively hosts broadway productions. 
Why This Matters: Imagine you’re walking along the Mid-Market Corridor (better known as Civic Center Plaza/Tenderloin). You’re probably feeling a bit anxious and for good reason: newly built million-dollar high-rises are popping up left & right while the problems of the Tenderloin community are still very much alive. New construction bringing in young wealthy tenants won’t end Tenderloin poverty. These longtime street inhabitants have nowhere else to go; this is their home. With this context in mind I strolled down Mid-Market and looked up at the world, unguarded for once, and felt a wave of shock. Standing amidst the urban conflict of new growth taking over old, I stared at the Orpheum Theater, shining elegantly as ever.
San Francisco had its heyday of glamorous theaters. Sadly, one by one they have disappeared. It matters that the Orpheum Theater remains—going strong after so long—especially in the heart of the Tenderloin. Without old, beautiful and nearly decaying buildings that need a little TLC, the city would be lost of any identity from the past, having no diversity to move forward. If such a lovely Spanish-Gothic building from the 20th century can stand amongst the the turmoil and changes of the City then it leaves me hope that other buildings of the kind can do the same.  
originsf:


Case Study #4: Orpheum Theater
Brief History: Built in 1926, the Orpheum Theater was designed by Benjamin Marcus Priteca and fashioned after a 12th-Century spanish cathedral. First named The Pantages Theatre after the vaudeville impresario Alexander Pantages, it was a prime theater for Cinerama entertainment. Cinerama was the process of showing widescreen films by simultaneously projecting images from three 35mm projectors onto one large, arched screen. It was a grand event to attend movies shown by Cinerama. People showed up wearing their finest for the evening. Though the Orpheum has changed ownership throughout the century, today it is run by Shorenstein Hays Nederlander (SHN), which actively hosts broadway productions. 
Why This Matters: Imagine you’re walking along the Mid-Market Corridor (better known as Civic Center Plaza/Tenderloin). You’re probably feeling a bit anxious and for good reason: newly built million-dollar high-rises are popping up left & right while the problems of the Tenderloin community are still very much alive. New construction bringing in young wealthy tenants won’t end Tenderloin poverty. These longtime street inhabitants have nowhere else to go; this is their home. With this context in mind I strolled down Mid-Market and looked up at the world, unguarded for once, and felt a wave of shock. Standing amidst the urban conflict of new growth taking over old, I stared at the Orpheum Theater, shining elegantly as ever.
San Francisco had its heyday of glamorous theaters. Sadly, one by one they have disappeared. It matters that the Orpheum Theater remains—going strong after so long—especially in the heart of the Tenderloin. Without old, beautiful and nearly decaying buildings that need a little TLC, the city would be lost of any identity from the past, having no diversity to move forward. If such a lovely Spanish-Gothic building from the 20th century can stand amongst the the turmoil and changes of the City then it leaves me hope that other buildings of the kind can do the same.  
originsf:


Case Study #4: Orpheum Theater
Brief History: Built in 1926, the Orpheum Theater was designed by Benjamin Marcus Priteca and fashioned after a 12th-Century spanish cathedral. First named The Pantages Theatre after the vaudeville impresario Alexander Pantages, it was a prime theater for Cinerama entertainment. Cinerama was the process of showing widescreen films by simultaneously projecting images from three 35mm projectors onto one large, arched screen. It was a grand event to attend movies shown by Cinerama. People showed up wearing their finest for the evening. Though the Orpheum has changed ownership throughout the century, today it is run by Shorenstein Hays Nederlander (SHN), which actively hosts broadway productions. 
Why This Matters: Imagine you’re walking along the Mid-Market Corridor (better known as Civic Center Plaza/Tenderloin). You’re probably feeling a bit anxious and for good reason: newly built million-dollar high-rises are popping up left & right while the problems of the Tenderloin community are still very much alive. New construction bringing in young wealthy tenants won’t end Tenderloin poverty. These longtime street inhabitants have nowhere else to go; this is their home. With this context in mind I strolled down Mid-Market and looked up at the world, unguarded for once, and felt a wave of shock. Standing amidst the urban conflict of new growth taking over old, I stared at the Orpheum Theater, shining elegantly as ever.
San Francisco had its heyday of glamorous theaters. Sadly, one by one they have disappeared. It matters that the Orpheum Theater remains—going strong after so long—especially in the heart of the Tenderloin. Without old, beautiful and nearly decaying buildings that need a little TLC, the city would be lost of any identity from the past, having no diversity to move forward. If such a lovely Spanish-Gothic building from the 20th century can stand amongst the the turmoil and changes of the City then it leaves me hope that other buildings of the kind can do the same.  
+
originsf:

Case Study #3: Land’s End (Part Two)
Brief History: Land’s End has always been known as ultra rugged and secluded from nearby inhabitants. By the time California became a state in 1850, the only visitors who braved the wooded seascape were naturalist observing marine life. 
What this untamed nature needed was an urban-political perspective to incorporate it into the city of San Francisco. In the 1880’s Aldoph Sutro made Land’s End a place that people wanted to come to. The first Cliff House (first of three because two burned down) was built as a wealthy person’s getaway in 1863. Yet Sutro believed San Franciscans of all economies should be able to enjoy the beautiful seaside. He immediately built a steam train that travelled from downtown SF to Land’s End for a cheap rate (even in the 1800s) for 5 cents a ride.  
Why This Matters: Point Lobos Avenue is a road known today by adventure enthusiasts and casual beach-goers of the Outside Lands. It begins where Geary Boulevard forks off near 42nd Avenue and it curves around the rocks where the Cliff House is perched, dipping down into Ocean Beach. Developed by a private company, the street was made for people to access this far-away retreat with ease. Some of the glamour is now lost. It’s no longer the 1860s when horse-drawn carriages travelled every Sunday from downtown to Lands End. Luckily, it’s just as easy to access this magical nature haven with the N Judah Muni or the 38 Geary bus which runs from downtown all the way to the end and you’re there! 
*All photos taken by Andrea. From the top down:
1) The view looking out from the Cliff House
2) Trees growing along the Coastal Trail in Land’s End 
3) A view from inside the cave of the Sutro Bath Ruins
4) Ocean Beach
5) Sutro Heights Monterey Cypress trees 
originsf:

Case Study #3: Land’s End (Part Two)
Brief History: Land’s End has always been known as ultra rugged and secluded from nearby inhabitants. By the time California became a state in 1850, the only visitors who braved the wooded seascape were naturalist observing marine life. 
What this untamed nature needed was an urban-political perspective to incorporate it into the city of San Francisco. In the 1880’s Aldoph Sutro made Land’s End a place that people wanted to come to. The first Cliff House (first of three because two burned down) was built as a wealthy person’s getaway in 1863. Yet Sutro believed San Franciscans of all economies should be able to enjoy the beautiful seaside. He immediately built a steam train that travelled from downtown SF to Land’s End for a cheap rate (even in the 1800s) for 5 cents a ride.  
Why This Matters: Point Lobos Avenue is a road known today by adventure enthusiasts and casual beach-goers of the Outside Lands. It begins where Geary Boulevard forks off near 42nd Avenue and it curves around the rocks where the Cliff House is perched, dipping down into Ocean Beach. Developed by a private company, the street was made for people to access this far-away retreat with ease. Some of the glamour is now lost. It’s no longer the 1860s when horse-drawn carriages travelled every Sunday from downtown to Lands End. Luckily, it’s just as easy to access this magical nature haven with the N Judah Muni or the 38 Geary bus which runs from downtown all the way to the end and you’re there! 
*All photos taken by Andrea. From the top down:
1) The view looking out from the Cliff House
2) Trees growing along the Coastal Trail in Land’s End 
3) A view from inside the cave of the Sutro Bath Ruins
4) Ocean Beach
5) Sutro Heights Monterey Cypress trees 
originsf:

Case Study #3: Land’s End (Part Two)
Brief History: Land’s End has always been known as ultra rugged and secluded from nearby inhabitants. By the time California became a state in 1850, the only visitors who braved the wooded seascape were naturalist observing marine life. 
What this untamed nature needed was an urban-political perspective to incorporate it into the city of San Francisco. In the 1880’s Aldoph Sutro made Land’s End a place that people wanted to come to. The first Cliff House (first of three because two burned down) was built as a wealthy person’s getaway in 1863. Yet Sutro believed San Franciscans of all economies should be able to enjoy the beautiful seaside. He immediately built a steam train that travelled from downtown SF to Land’s End for a cheap rate (even in the 1800s) for 5 cents a ride.  
Why This Matters: Point Lobos Avenue is a road known today by adventure enthusiasts and casual beach-goers of the Outside Lands. It begins where Geary Boulevard forks off near 42nd Avenue and it curves around the rocks where the Cliff House is perched, dipping down into Ocean Beach. Developed by a private company, the street was made for people to access this far-away retreat with ease. Some of the glamour is now lost. It’s no longer the 1860s when horse-drawn carriages travelled every Sunday from downtown to Lands End. Luckily, it’s just as easy to access this magical nature haven with the N Judah Muni or the 38 Geary bus which runs from downtown all the way to the end and you’re there! 
*All photos taken by Andrea. From the top down:
1) The view looking out from the Cliff House
2) Trees growing along the Coastal Trail in Land’s End 
3) A view from inside the cave of the Sutro Bath Ruins
4) Ocean Beach
5) Sutro Heights Monterey Cypress trees 
originsf:

Case Study #3: Land’s End (Part Two)
Brief History: Land’s End has always been known as ultra rugged and secluded from nearby inhabitants. By the time California became a state in 1850, the only visitors who braved the wooded seascape were naturalist observing marine life. 
What this untamed nature needed was an urban-political perspective to incorporate it into the city of San Francisco. In the 1880’s Aldoph Sutro made Land’s End a place that people wanted to come to. The first Cliff House (first of three because two burned down) was built as a wealthy person’s getaway in 1863. Yet Sutro believed San Franciscans of all economies should be able to enjoy the beautiful seaside. He immediately built a steam train that travelled from downtown SF to Land’s End for a cheap rate (even in the 1800s) for 5 cents a ride.  
Why This Matters: Point Lobos Avenue is a road known today by adventure enthusiasts and casual beach-goers of the Outside Lands. It begins where Geary Boulevard forks off near 42nd Avenue and it curves around the rocks where the Cliff House is perched, dipping down into Ocean Beach. Developed by a private company, the street was made for people to access this far-away retreat with ease. Some of the glamour is now lost. It’s no longer the 1860s when horse-drawn carriages travelled every Sunday from downtown to Lands End. Luckily, it’s just as easy to access this magical nature haven with the N Judah Muni or the 38 Geary bus which runs from downtown all the way to the end and you’re there! 
*All photos taken by Andrea. From the top down:
1) The view looking out from the Cliff House
2) Trees growing along the Coastal Trail in Land’s End 
3) A view from inside the cave of the Sutro Bath Ruins
4) Ocean Beach
5) Sutro Heights Monterey Cypress trees 
originsf:

Case Study #3: Land’s End (Part Two)
Brief History: Land’s End has always been known as ultra rugged and secluded from nearby inhabitants. By the time California became a state in 1850, the only visitors who braved the wooded seascape were naturalist observing marine life. 
What this untamed nature needed was an urban-political perspective to incorporate it into the city of San Francisco. In the 1880’s Aldoph Sutro made Land’s End a place that people wanted to come to. The first Cliff House (first of three because two burned down) was built as a wealthy person’s getaway in 1863. Yet Sutro believed San Franciscans of all economies should be able to enjoy the beautiful seaside. He immediately built a steam train that travelled from downtown SF to Land’s End for a cheap rate (even in the 1800s) for 5 cents a ride.  
Why This Matters: Point Lobos Avenue is a road known today by adventure enthusiasts and casual beach-goers of the Outside Lands. It begins where Geary Boulevard forks off near 42nd Avenue and it curves around the rocks where the Cliff House is perched, dipping down into Ocean Beach. Developed by a private company, the street was made for people to access this far-away retreat with ease. Some of the glamour is now lost. It’s no longer the 1860s when horse-drawn carriages travelled every Sunday from downtown to Lands End. Luckily, it’s just as easy to access this magical nature haven with the N Judah Muni or the 38 Geary bus which runs from downtown all the way to the end and you’re there! 
*All photos taken by Andrea. From the top down:
1) The view looking out from the Cliff House
2) Trees growing along the Coastal Trail in Land’s End 
3) A view from inside the cave of the Sutro Bath Ruins
4) Ocean Beach
5) Sutro Heights Monterey Cypress trees